Trump releases letter from Kim Jong Un, touts "great progress"

US President Donald Trump said he received a note from North Korean leader Kim Jong-un in which Mr Kim said he believed their efforts to improve relations will succeed.

President Trump shakes hands with North Korean leader Kim Jong Un at the Capella resort on Sentosa Island in Singapore on June 12. US intelligence analysts said in the wake of the summit that Pyongyang is working to hide key elements of its program, including the number of weapons it maintains and secret production facilities.

In the meeting at the Korean Peninsula's demilitarized zone, the two sides had been expected to discuss the return of US troops' remains from the 1950-53 Korean War - an arrangement that the State Department had announced after Secretary Michael R. Pompeo's visit to Pyongyang last weekend.

Mr Kim had agreed during the summit with President Trump to recover "POW/MIA remains, including the immediate repatriation of those already identified".

Several days previously, Pyongyang had slated the USA for seeking unilateral and forced denuclearization from North Korea.

North Korea has reportedly proposed holding general-level military talks with the United Nations Command (UNC) over the repatriation of remains of American troops killed during the 1950-53 Korean War, sources here said Thursday.

Other speculation is that North Korea was discomforted with the way it was portrayed by the US media _ as trying to make money from the war remains.


That statement said North Korea would "work toward complete denuclearization of the Korean Peninsula", but offered not details on when or how Pyongyang would relinquish its program.

Trump tweeted on Thursday alongside a copy of the letter, dated July 6. On the day he left the North issued a statement on state-run media accusing the United States of "gangster-like" demands for unilateral disarmament.

Mr. Pompeo denied that the talks went poorly, telling pool reporters that progress was made "in every element of our discussions".

One problem - no North Korean officials showed up, The New York Times reported.

KCNA did not say when the trip was made, but Kim Yong Chol, Kim's powerful right-hand man, told a visiting Seoul official last week that the leader was away for a trip to a "local region".

The USFK sent 100 wooden cases to the truce village of Panmunjeom to receive the remains last month, and also has 158 coffins ready at a base in Pyeongtaek to take the remains back to the U.S.

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