Trump says does not endorse G7 communique, after 'weak' Trudeau comments

ImageProto-Canadians disguised as British troops set the torch to Washington in 1814 during the War of 1812

ImageProto-Canadians disguised as British troops set the torch to Washington in 1814 during the War of 1812

US President Donald Trump has thrown two days of diplomatic talks into chaos, insulting Canada's Prime Minister and tweeting that the United States would not endorse the joint communique that leaders from the Group of Seven nations negotiated at this weekend's summit.

The two-day summit has been marred by a tit-for-tat exchanges of hostile tweets, with USA trading partners furious over Trump's decision to impose tariffs on steel and aluminum imports from Canada, the European Union and Mexico as part of his "America First" agenda.

"The European Union is brutal to the United States ..." Or we'll stop trading with them.

The early exit also means he will be gone before allies begin closing news conferences likely to be laden with criticism of the USA stance on trade and Mr Trump's abrupt suggestion on Friday that Russian Federation be re-admitted to the elite grouping. He added that he did not blame G7 leaders for the "unfair" trade deals. The European leaders sought to show unity against Trump and prod him into concessions on the tariffs, or at least an agreement to talk more about them.

The PM also said she had spoken to Mr Trump "briefly" at the summit about his upcoming visit to the UK.

Reacting to Trump's tweets, Trudeau's office said: "We are focused on everything we accomplished here at the summit".

In response, Trump clapped back against Trudeau on Twitter, writing - without calling Trudeau out by name - "The United States will not allow other countries to impose massive Tariffs and Trade Barriers on its farmers, workers and companies".

Trump says his tariffs are meant to protect US industry and workers from unfair worldwide competition as part of his "America First" agenda.


"Let's say Canada, where we have tremendous tariffs".

In the run-up to the G7 summit, USA relations with the most of the remaining G7 countries have deteriorated, since Washington removed an exemption on 25 percent tariffs for steel and 10 percent for aluminum from Canada, Mexico, and the European Union, which prompted the bloc and Canada to roll out retaliatory measures.

President Donald Trump meets with Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau during the G-7 summit on Friday in Charlevoix, Canada.

"I guess they're going to go back to the drawing board and check it out, right?" he said, warning that if his fellow six leaders make good on their threats to take retaliatory measures, they could find themselves shut out of American markets.

Trump's reversal, announced while he was en route to Singapore for a meeting with North Korean leader Kim Jong Un, sent his G7 partners scrambling.

The American leader said a three-country deal would only be possible with substantial changes, and reiterated his interest instead in forming separate two-way trade accords with Mexico and Canada - an interest Canada has made clear it does not share.

White House officials did not immediately respond to requests for comment on the characterisations by these officials of Trump's remarks or attention to the presentations.

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